Sustainable Procurement News
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Sustainable Procurement News
Latest news, trends, ideas on Sustainable / Responsible Procurement and Green Supply Chain from EcoVadis
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UK fashion retailers and law enforcement agencies to partner on tackling modern slavery

Some of the UK's largest fashion retailers, including John Lewis and Marks & Spencer (M&S), have committed to work with law enforcement bodies to help identify and act on cases of modern slavery in the textiles industry.
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North Korean labourer takes Dutch shipbuilder to court over claims of ‘slave-like’ working conditions

North Korean labourer takes Dutch shipbuilder to court over claims of ‘slave-like’ working conditions | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it

A North Korean labourer has filed a landmark criminal complaint against a Dutch shipbuilding company that allegedly profited from the abuse of workers in its supply chain in Poland and was aware of the “slave-like conditions”, lawyers said on Thursday. The legal action could pile pressure on other companies in the Netherlands and beyond that profit from modern slavery in their global operations, according to lawyers and activists.

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Marks & Spencer tops list of major British firms tackling modern slavery

Marks & Spencer tops list of major British firms tackling modern slavery | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it

Major retailer Marks & Spencer (MKS.L) topped a list on Tuesday ranking Britain's biggest businesses on their efforts to tackle modern slavery, yet labour experts urged the country's top 100 companies to be more transparent and lead by example globally. 

EcoVadis's insight:

Great job by Marks & Spencer. In our global economy, supply chain management has proven to be a complex challenge. If your company provides goods or services to a large multi-national, you no doubt have been measured on the traditional criterias of quality, cost effectiveness, speed, and reliability. 

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M&S ranked best FTSE 100 for tackling modern slavery

Marks & Spencer (M&S) has topped a FTSE 100 ranking for its compliance with the Modern Slavery Act (MSA). The retailer achieved the highest company score in an analysis of publicly available modern slavery statements, compiled by the non-profit Development International (DI) as part of its inaugural Global Governance FTSE 100 League Table. M&S was followed by Tesco, British American Tobacco and Morrisons.

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Supermarkets recognise slavery risk in seafood supply chains

Supermarkets recognise slavery risk in seafood supply chains | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it

The SCC, whose members include Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons, Waitrose, Marks and Spencer and Lidl, now states members must comply with the Modern Slavery Act and have policies that “consider social and ethical challenges in seafood sourcing in their supply chains”. The seafood sector has come under fire for cases of forced labour and modern slavery, mostly in Southeast Asia. SCC coordinator Oliver Tanqueray said: “The risk of modern slavery is taken very seriously by the seafood industry and it’s positive that these leading UK seafood businesses formally agree to recognise the challenge

EcoVadis's insight:

Current legislation regarding forced labor in supply chains, including the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act and the UK Modern Slavery Act, require companies to disclose their efforts to identify and prevent supply chain forced labor.

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Modern slavery promotes overfishing

Modern slavery promotes overfishing | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it
Labour abuses, including modern slavery, are 'hidden subsidies' that allow distant-water fishing fleets to remain profitable and promote overfishing, new research from the University of Western Australia and the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia has found.
EcoVadis's insight:

While environmental repercussions of overfishing have traditionally been the focus among seafood consumers, labor practices in the seafood industry supply chains have recently emerged as the most discussed Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) issue plaguing the sector.

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Modern slavery promotes overfishing

Modern slavery promotes overfishing | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it
By combining fisheries data from the Sea Around Us initiative at UBC with country-level data on modern slavery, the researchers found that countries whose fleets rely heavily on government subsidies, fish far away from home ports, and fail to comprehensively report their actual catch, tend to fish beyond sustainable limits and are at higher risk of labour abuses.
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World backs data 'revolution' in global anti-slavery drive

World backs data 'revolution' in global anti-slavery drive | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it

A global agreement to map and count the victims of forced labour is a landmark that activists say will revolutionise efforts to free millions of people around the world from modern slavery.

EcoVadis's insight:

Much is being done in terms of international and national regulations to eradicate modern slavery, and businesses worldwide are becoming increasingly committed to sustainable procurement. However, to make a real difference, more emphasis needs to be placed on truly understanding the plight of the people who end up in forced labor.

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UK agrees new principles to combat supply chain modern slavery

UK agrees new principles to combat supply chain modern slavery | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it

The UK has developed four new principles for tackling modern slavery, in partnership with the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. Announced at the UN General Assembly this week, the principles focus on mobilising private sector and legislative actors to prevent and address cases of human trafficking in supply chains. The Global Slavery Index estimates that 45.8 million people across 167 countries are working in conditions defined as modern slavery. The UK Government estimated that around 13,000 people in Britain are living in modern slavery today. The UK Government has claimed that modern slavery costs the national economy around £4.3bn annually, with external reports noting that UK imports more than £13.7bn of “at-risk” goods, likely to have been produced through forced labour annually. The nations involved in the new set of principles believe that up to $600bn of purchasing power can be leveraged by governments and business to prevent forced labour across both sectors.

EcoVadis's insight:

Great job UK! EcoVadis can provide the information you need to make sure you are not knowingly employing slave labour in your supply chain. It maps supply chains to identify countries and sectors with the potential for slavery and human trafficking.

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Erratic aid spending could derail drive to end slavery by 2030

Erratic aid spending could derail drive to end slavery by 2030 | Sustainable Procurement News | Scoop.it

Patchy, politicised and poorly coordinated aid spending by the world's top economies to stop modern slavery could hinder a drive to end the multi-billion dollar crime by 2030 and erode public support for such funding, experts said on Thursday. United Nations research, revealed exclusively by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, found that annual anti-trafficking overseas development aid (ODA) by the 36-nation OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) at least tripled to $434 million from 2000 to 2013. The United States was the largest donor - accounting for 60 percent of $4 billion pledged in this period - followed by Canada and Norway, and Afghanistan, India and Colombia were the top recipients, according to the U.N. University (UNU) report. Yet many nations received small or inconsistent sums, raising fears about the effectiveness and sustainability of anti-slavery funding given the dearth of data on its impact. The data found that some of the countries receiving the most anti-slavery ODA were not the nations estimated to be the most affected by slavery, with aid and trafficking experts suggesting some cash is pledged for political as well as practical reasons.

EcoVadis's insight:

Human trafficking, essentially modern slavery, happens all around the world, even in developed countries such as the United States, and poses risks to companies across all industries.

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